Relationship between the gastrointestinal side effects of an anti-hypertensive medication and changes in the serum lipid metabolome

Yoomin Ahn, Myung Hee Nam, Eungbin Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An earlier study using a rat model system indicated that the active ingredients contained in the anti-hypertensive medication amlodipine (AMD) appeared to induce various bowel problems, including constipation and inflammation. A probiotic blend was found to alleviate intestinal complications caused by the medicine. To gain more extensive insight into the beneficial effects of the probiotic blend, we investigated the changes in metabolite levels using a non-targeted metabolic approach with ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole/time-of-fligh (UPLC-q/TOF) mass spectrometry. Analysis of lipid metabolites revealed that rats that received AMD had a different metabolome profile compared with control rats and rats that received AMD plus the probiotic blend. In the AMD-administered group, serum levels of phosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, triglycerides with large numbers of double bonds, cholesterols, sterol derivatives, and cholesterol esters (all p < 0.05) were increased compared with those of the control group and the group that received AMD plus the probiotic blend. The AMD-administered group also exhibited significantly decreased levels of triglycerides with small numbers of double bonds (all p < 0.05). These results support our hypothesis that AMD-induced compositional changes in the gut microbiota are a causal factor in inflammation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number205
JournalNutrients
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Jan

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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