Primary Autologous Osteochondral Transfer Shows Superior Long-Term Outcome and Survival Rate Compared With Bone Marrow Stimulation for Large Cystic Osteochondral Lesion of Talus

Dong Woo Shim, Kwang Hwan Park, Jin Woo Lee, Yun jung Yang, Jucheol Shin, Seung Hwan Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To compare the results of bone marrow stimulation (BMS) versus autologous osteochondral transfer (AOT) as primary surgical option for large cystic osteochondral lesion of talus (OLT) and to further distinguish factors associated with clinical failures and overall survival. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients with symptomatic large cystic OLT (>300 mm3) who underwent either primary BMS or AOT between January 2001 and January 2016 with a minimum follow-up of 36 months. Lesion surface area and volume were measured on magnetic resonance imaging. Clinical outcomes were assessed using pain visual analog scale (VAS), American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, and Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS). Survival outcomes and factors associated with clinical failures were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression analyses, respectively. Results: Fifty of the total 853 patients had large cystic OLTs. Thirty-two patients underwent primary BMS, and 18 patients underwent primary AOT. Mean follow-up period was 118 months, and average lesion surface area and volume were 152.8 mm2 and 850.7 mm3, respectively. The primary AOT group showed significantly superior improvements in clinical outcomes compared with the BMS group at last follow-up (P =.001). Fourteen patients in the primary BMS group and 2 patients in the primary AOT group experienced clinical failure. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a superior survival rate of primary AOT (P =.042). Syndesmosis widening (hazard ratio 12.361; P =.004) and large lesion surface area (hazard ratio 1.011; P =.014) were significant relative risks of clinical failure in the primary BMS group. However, lesion volume showed no significant relationship with clinical failure. Conclusion: Long-term results of primary AOT showed superior clinical improvements and survival rate in treating large cystic OLT. Risk factors for failure in the primary BMS group were large lesion surface area and syndesmosis widening. Study Design: Retrospective comparative study Level of Evidence: III.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)989-997
Number of pages9
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Mar

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Arthroscopy Association of North America

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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