Phytochemicals in chinese chive (Allium tuberosum) induce the skeletal muscle cell proliferation via pi3k/akt/mtor and smad pathways in c2c12 cells

Mira Oh, Seo Young Kim, Seonju Park, Kil Nam Kim, Seung Hyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum) is a medicinal food that is cultivated and consumed mainly in Asian countries. Its various phytochemicals and physiological effects have been reported, but only a few phytochemicals are available for skeletal muscle cell proliferation. Herein, we isolated a new compound, kaempferol-3-O-(6″-feruloyl)-sophoroside (1), along with one known flavonoid glycoside (2) and six amino acid (3–8) compounds from the water-soluble fraction of the shoot of the Chinese chive. The isolated compounds were identified using extensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D NMR, and evaluated for their proliferation activity on skeletal muscle cells. Among the tested compounds, newly isolated flavonoid (1) and 5-aminouridine (7) up-regulated PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways, which implies a positive effect on skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. In particular, compound 1 down-regulated the Smad pathways, which are negative regulators of skeletal muscle growth. Collectively, we suggest that major constituents of Chinese chive, flavonoids and amino acids, might be used in dietary supplements that aid skeletal muscle growth.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2296
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalInternational journal of molecular sciences
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Mar 1

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

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