Older adults consider others’ intentions less but allocentric outcomes more than young adults during an ultimatum game.

Isu Cho, Hyun joo Song, Hackjin Kim, Sunhae Sul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present research investigated age-related differences in other-regarding preferences—the preference for taking others’ benefit into account during social decision-making—between young and elderly adults. Young and older Korean adults responded to multiple rounds of a mini-ultimatum game, and the extent to which each individual considered outcome and intention was quantified using economic utility models. We found that older adults, compared to young adults, were less likely to consider others’ intentions, while focusing more on others’ outcomes. Possible psychological factors underlying our findings, including theory of mind, prosocial values, and decision strategies, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)974-980
Number of pages7
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume35
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 American Psychological Association

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Ageing
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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