Mercury remediation from wastewater through its spontaneous adsorption on non-functionalized inverse spinel magnetic ferrite nanoparticles

Herlys Viltres, Nishesh Kumar Gupta, Roxana Paz, Rushikesh P. Dhavale, Hyung Ho Park, Carolina Leyva, Seshasai Srinivasan, Amin Reza Rajabzadeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, inverse spinel cubic ferrites MFe2O4 (M = Fe2+, and Co2+) have been fabricated for the high-capacity adsorptive removal of Hg(II) ions. The PXRD analysis confirmed ferrites with the presence of residual NaCl. The surface area of Fe3O4 (Fe-F) and CoFe2O4 (Co-F) material was 69.1 and 45.2 m2 g−1, respectively. The Co-F and Fe-F showed the maximum Hg(II) adsorption capacity of 459 and 436 mg g−1 at pH 6. The kinetic and isotherms models suggested a spontaneous adsorption process involving chemical forces over the ferrite adsorbents. The Hg(II) adsorption process, probed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), confirmed the interaction of Hg(II) ions with the surface hydroxyl groups via a complexation mechanism instead of proton exchange at pH 6 with the involvement of chloride ions. Thus, this study demonstrates a viable and cost-effective solution for the efficient remediation of Hg ions from wastewater using non-functionalized ferrite adsorbents. This study also systematically investigates the kinetics and isotherm mechanism of Hg(II) adsorption onto ferrites and reports one of the highest Hg(II) adsorption capacities among other ferrite-based adsorbents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1155-1168
Number of pages14
JournalEnvironmental Technology (United Kingdom)
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Waste Management and Disposal

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