In the name of immigrant mothers: Gendered mobilization of Korean-Chinese women in South Korea

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Abstract

Drawing on ethnographic data from the anti-deportation protest of the Seoul Korean-Chinese Church (SKCC) in 2013, I examine the impact of gender on the mobilization of Korean-Chinese immigrant women in South Korea. Despite legal, economic, and religious differences, these protesters have bonded greatly among themselves, largely because of their immigrant mother identity. As the leaders of their family migration projects, both Christians and non-believers have grown to feel a strong sense of kinship and acknowledge the efficacy of collective action. Emotional protest rituals and the political impact of the activist-clergy have prompted the mobilization and consequent politicization of these largely women demonstrators. Early social movement literature has overlooked the impact of gender identity on women’s collective action, while my study shows how gender intersects with diasporic identities, to enable the mobilization of immigrant women for the collective goal of justice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)515-536
Number of pages22
JournalAsian Journal of Women's Studies
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Oct 2

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019, © 2019 Asian Center for Women's Studies, Ewha Womans University.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies

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