Discrepancy between the Status Quo and Adjusted Risk of First-Onset Suicidal Ideation in Older Adults: A Longitudinal Study Based on the Korean Welfare Panel Study (2011–2021)

Youngdae Cho, Suk Yong Jang, Eun Cheol Park, Jean Kyung Bak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Whether older adults can more likely commit suicide than those in other age groups, after adjusting for other possible causes, remains unknown. We aimed to examine why elderly individuals are more likely to develop first-onset suicidal ideation than individuals in other age groups. We identified 2018 young, 3329 middle-aged, and 2714 elderly individuals without a history of suicidal ideation, from the Korean Welfare Panel Study 2011–2021. To determine key stressors that can induce suicidal ideation, selected groups of variables were adjusted progressively in a generalized estimating equation (GEE) model. Incidence rates of the elderly, middle-aged, and young individuals were 15.9, 22.0, and 11.3 per 1000 person-years, respectively. In GEE analysis, a positive association was not noted between age group and suicidal ideation after adjusting for stressor variables. Furthermore, the overly adjusted model (Full model) showed a strong negative association with aging; young [odds ratio (OR): 1.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.35–2.11] and middle-aged (OR: 1.94, 95% CI: 1.38–2.73) individuals were more likely to develop first-onset suicidal ideation than the elderly. We found that full models, particularly assessing wealth rather than income, can explain why the elderly have higher suicide rates than those in other age groups.

Original languageEnglish
Article number224
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023 Jan

Bibliographical note

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© 2022 by the authors.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Medicine

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