Cultured human skeletal muscle satellite cells exhibit characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells and play anti-inflammatory roles through prostaglandin E2 and hepatocyte growth factors

Seongyup Kim, Pil Young Jung, Jin Suk Lee, Soonjae Hwang, Joon Hyung Sohn, Yongdae Yoon, Keum Seok Bae, Young Woo Eom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SkMSCs) play crucial roles in muscle fiber maintenance, repair, and remodeling; however, it remains unknown if these properties are preserved in cultured SkMSCs. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of cultured SkMSCs and their ability to regulate the activity of M1 macrophages. SkMSCs grew well with an average population doubling time of 26.26 ± 6.85 h during 10 passages (P). At P5, Pax7, MyoD, cluster of differentiation (CD)34, and CD56 were not expressed in SkMSCs, but the MSC markers CD73, CD105, and CD90 were expressed and the cells were differentiated into adipocytes and osteoblasts. When SkMSCs were cocultured with macrophages, interleukin (IL)-1β secretion was decreased, prostaglandin (PG)E2 was produced in coculture, and cyclooxygenase-2 protein was induced in an SkMSC-dependent manner. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) was highly secreted by monocultured SkMSCs; interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide reduced its expression level. However, HGF expression recovered when SkMSCs and macrophages were cocultured. Although exogenous PGE2 upregulated macrophage pro-IL-1β expression, it suppressed the secretion of cleaved IL-1β. In contrast, HGF decreased active IL-1β secretion without affecting pro-IL-1β expression. Co-treatment of macrophages with HGF and PGE2 reduced pro-IL-1β expression level and active IL-1β secretion. Our results suggest that SkMSCs lose their satellite cell properties during serial passaging but acquire mesenchymal stem cell properties including the ability to exert an anti-inflammatory response for macrophages through PGE2 and HGF.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2443-2451
Number of pages9
JournalCell Biology International
Volume45
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Dec

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 International Federation for Cell Biology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cell Biology

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