Childhood physical neglect and psychotic experiences: Findings from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication

Andrew Stickley, Kyle Waldman, Tomiki Sumiyoshi, Zui Narita, Aya Shirama, Jae Il Shin, Hans Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Childhood adversities have been linked to an increased risk for psychosis. However, as yet, there has been comparatively little research on the effects of neglect. This study examined the association between childhood physical neglect and psychotic experiences (PEs) in a general population sample. Methods: Data were analysed from 2308 individuals collected during the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R). Information on lifetime PEs was collected with the WHO-CIDI Psychosis Screen. Respondents also reported on five forms of childhood neglect (went hungry, went without necessities, went unsupervised, lacked medical care, chores too difficult/dangerous). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations. Results: In models adjusted for sociodemographic and psychiatric disorder variables, aggregated physical neglect scores (continuous/dichotomized) were associated with significantly increased odds for any lifetime PEs. All individual forms of neglect except went without necessities (odds ratio [OR]: 1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98-1.50) were significantly associated with PEs with ORs ranging from 1.28 (95% CI: 1.08-1.51, went unsupervised) to 1.53 (95% CI: 1.19-1.97, went without medical care). In models that were further adjusted for co-occurring forms of neglect and childhood physical abuse, doing chores that were too difficult/dangerous continued to be associated with significantly increased odds for PEs (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.03-1.61). Conclusions: Childhood physical neglect is associated with significantly increased odds for PEs in the general population. Screening for childhood adversities and PEs among potential patients may be important for the early detection of individuals at high risk for psychosis, as well as for formulating comprehensive and effective treatment plans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)256-262
Number of pages7
JournalEarly Intervention in Psychiatry
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Apr

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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