Balance Training Does Not Alter Reliance on Visual Information during Static Stance in Those with Chronic Ankle Instability: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

Kyeongtak Song, Evan Rhodes, Erik A. Wikstrom

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Visual, vestibular, and somatosensory systems contribute to postural control. Chronic ankle instability (CAI) patients have been observed to have a reduced ability to dynamically shift their reliance among sources of sensory information and rely more heavily on visual information during a single-limb stance relative to uninjured controls. Balance training is proven to improve postural control but there is a lack of evidence regarding the ability of balance training programs to alter the reliance on visual information in CAI patients. Objective: Our objective was to determine if balance training alters the reliance on visual information during static stance in CAI patients. Methods: The PubMed, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus databases were searched from their earliest available date to October 2017 using a combination of keywords. Study inclusion criteria consisted of (1) using participants with CAI; (2) use of a balance training intervention; and (3) calculation of an objective measure of static postural control during single-limb stance with eyes open and eyes closed. Sample sizes, means, and standard deviations of single-leg balance measures for eyes-open and eyes-closed testing conditions before and after balance training were extracted from the included studies. Eyes-open to eyes-closed effect sizes [Hedges’ g and 95% confidence intervals (CI)] before and after balance training were calculated, and between-study variability for heterogeneity and potential risks of publication bias were examined. Results: Six studies were identified. The overall eyes-open to eyes-closed effect size difference between pre- and post-intervention assessments was not significant (Hedges’ g effect size = 0.151, 95% CI = − 0.151 to 0.453, p = 0.26). This result indicates that the utilization of visual information in individuals with CAI during the single-leg balance is not altered after balance training. Low heterogeneity (Q(5) = 2.96, p = 0.71, I2 = 0%) of the included studies and no publication bias were found. Conclusion: On the basis of our systematic review with meta-analysis, it appears that traditional balance training protocols do not alter the reliance on visual information used by CAI patients during a single-leg stance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)893-905
Number of pages13
JournalSports Medicine
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Apr 1

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017, Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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