Association of urinary potassium excretion with blood pressure variability and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease

Korean Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD) Investigators

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dietary potassium intake is a dilemma in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We investigated the association of urine potassium excretion, a surrogate for dietary potassium intake, with blood pressure variability (BPV) and cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in patients with pre-dialysis CKD. A total of 1860 participants from a cohort of pre-dialysis CKD (KNOW-CKD) patients were divided into the quartiles by spot urine potassium-to-creatinine ratio. The first quartile (26.423 ± 5.731 mmol/gCr) was defined as low urine potassium excretion. Multivariate linear regression analyses revealed an independent association of low urine potassium excretion with high BPV (adjusted β coefficient 1.163, 95% confidence interval 0.424 to 1.901). Cox regression analyses demonstrated that, compared to high urine potassium excretion, low urine potassium excretion is associated with increased risk of CV events (adjusted hazard ratio 2.502, 95% confidence interval 1.162 to 5.387) but not with all-cause mortality. In conclusion, low urine potassium excretion is associated with high BPV and increased risk of CV events in patients with pre-dialysis CKD. The restriction of dietary potassium intake should be individualized in patients with pre-dialysis CKD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4443
JournalNutrients
Volume13
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Dec

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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