Association of Occupational Noise Exposure and Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome in a Retrospective Cohort Study

Gwansic Kim, Hanjun Kim, Byungyoon Yun, Juho Sim, Changyoung Kim, Yeonsuh Oh, Jinha Yoon, Jiho Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome is one of the common causes of cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Although noise is an environmental factor to which people can be commonly exposed at work and in daily life, there are currently insufficient studies on the relationship between noise and metabolic syndrome. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between noise and metabolic syndrome. Using a multivariate time-dependent Cox proportional hazard model, the impacts of occupational noise exposure on metabolic syndrome and its components were analyzed in a retrospective cohort of 60,727 participants from 2014 to 2017. The noise exposure group showed a significantly higher incidence of metabolic syndrome and was associated with elevated triglycerides, blood sugar, and blood pressure, but decreased high-density lipoprotein, among subgroups. There was no statistically significant association with abdominal obesity. Occupational noise exposure significantly contributed to the incidence of metabolic syndrome and changes in its components. This study could be a basis for establishing policies and guidelines to reduce noise exposure that might improve workers’ health.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2209
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Feb 1

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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