Antibiotic prescription for acute upper respiratory tract infections: Understanding patient and physician contributions via patients’ migration

Woohyeon Kim, Euna Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Inappropriate antibiotic use is a main driver in microbes' development of antibiotic resistance. This study explored the extent to which patient, provider, and other factors contribute to antibiotic prescriptions for acute upper respiratory tract infection. We exploited exogenous patients' temporary and permanent migration from their residential area to robustly separate patient-related, provider-related, and other factors in terms of their contributions to antibiotic use. We analyzed claims of 914,013 URI patients from the 2002–2019 Korean National Health Insurance Sample Cohort Database. The results showed that both patient- and provider-related factors affect antibiotic use for upper respiratory tract infection treatment, although providers' impact is stronger than that of patients. Further decomposition analysis confirmed that provider-related factors explain about 55% of the total variance in antibiotic use. The demand side contributes to approximately 33–34% of the variance. Providers’ local market share and market competitiveness are associated with antibiotic prescription. The findings suggest that regulations to reduce antibiotic consumption in Korea should target both patients and providers with appropriate quantifiable penalties.

Original languageEnglish
Article number115466
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume314
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Dec

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Elsevier Ltd

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

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