Adherence to Long-Acting Inhaler Use for Initial Treatment and Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Hee Sook Suh, Min Seok Chang, Iseul Yu, Sunmin Park, Ji Ho Lee, Seok Jeong Lee, Won Yeon Lee, Suk Joong Yong, Sang Ha Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We aimed to determine the effect of long-acting inhaler use adherence on acute exacerbations in treatment-naïve patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using claims data from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service from July 2015–December 2016. Patients with COPD aged ≥ 40 years who used long-acting inhalers were enrolled and observed for 6 months. Medication adherence was determined by the medication possession ratio (MPR); patients were categorized to adherence (MPR ≥ 80%) and non-adherence (MPR < 80%) groups. Ultimately, 3959 patients were enrolled: 60.4% and 39.6% in the adherence and non-adherence groups, respectively. The relative risk of acute exacerbation in the non-adherence group was 1.58 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25–1.99) compared with the adherence group. The adjusted logistic regression analysis revealed a relative risk of acute exacerbation in the non-adherence vs. adherence group of 1.68 (95% CI 1.32–2.14) regarding the number of inhalers used. Poor adherence to long-acting inhalers influenced increased acute exacerbation rates among patients with COPD. The acute exacerbation of COPD risk requiring hospitalization or ED visits was high in the non-adherence group, suggesting that efforts to improve medication adherence may help reduce COPD exacerbations even in the initial management of treatment-naïve patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2073
JournalJournal of Personalized Medicine
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Dec

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 by the authors.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Adherence to Long-Acting Inhaler Use for Initial Treatment and Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Retrospective Cohort Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this